OpenGeofiction

UN1TY's diary

Recent diary entries

Out of Bounds

Posted by UN1TY on 29 June 2017 in English (English)

Lately I tried to re-edit the boundary between Cameron and Ghranata states in Unesia.

It had been a year since I first made the boundaries, so I re-read the tutorial on Administrative Boundaries. It seemed pretty straightforward, yet after several attempts, the boundary didn’t render.

Another weird thing is that the boundary showed up in JOSM, but not iD. I didn’t notice any breaks in the way, and the end nodes are all connected to the adjacent ways in the relations. I also checked for duplicate ways and found none, so I don’t know what the problem is. Maybe it’s something obvious I’m overlooking, but I can’t see it.

Can anyone help with this?

Location: G46, Firāsat فِراسة, Unesia

Hydrology

Posted by UN1TY on 22 June 2017 in English (English)

Lately I’ve been doing a lot of detailed work in the center of
Musawir . I’ve been feeling OK about the detail work, but the geography of the surrounding cityscape has been a nagging problem. I don't want to proceed with more detailing if the geographic foundation is too unrealistic.

I originally designed the city about 10-12 years ago and traced it into OGF. The initial concept had the Taswir River spelling the word “Musawir” in the Almukhtaran language as it passed through the city. The city would become a capitol and center of religious knowledge due it's auspicious location. It's extreme population density would be the result of people crowding to live near the sacred river and it's surrounding lakes.

After doing some research, though, I realized that the water volume for the river wouldn’t be nearly enough to justify it’s width. It would need a much larger watershed, extending deep into neighboring territories. Also, I never liked how the river had to run north to go south to Ma'amil.

Eventually I changed to the river into a lake , hoping to solve the volume problem, but that created a new problem: I needed an impervious barrier to keep the water in the lake, so I envisioned the city having a ridge to the south that would be formed of solid granite. That’s fine, but then I needed to justify the shape of the lake, so I figured that the areas the lake filled in were made from weaker soils that over time eroded. But then I would have to construct massive levees to keep the rest of the city from flooding. it seems the more corrections I made, the more problems arose.

I’m hoping that someone can help me with the hydrological aspect of the cityscape so that it can be salvaged in a realistic way. Musawir plays a crucial role in the history of Unesia. If I move it or erase it, the whole country would be affected.

UN1TY

Location: G26, Musāwir المصؤر, Unesia

ARCHANTA FLOODED?

Posted by UN1TY on 14 July 2016 in English (English)

I just opened OGF and noticed my whole country Unesia is now shaded blue. I'm a relatively new user, but this matches the description of a continental flooding, which is bad news for anyone in Archanta. I guess this means no more editing for a while.

ADDING IMAGES

Posted by UN1TY on 28 May 2016 in English (English)

How do you add .jpeg or .png images to diary entries?

Also, how do yo get the map projection to automatically show up in the body of the diary entry?

Does this require any coding? I'm not too computer savvy.

Alternative Way to Make Realistic Mountains

Posted by UN1TY on 26 May 2016 in English (English)

With Dorchester National Park, I initially started tracing from a photo, and using the land use and geography attributes to add contrasting colors (park=green, forest=dark green, scrub=yellow green etc.) In the original photo, the mountains were barren, except for some glaciers (which I converted to lakes).

After a few weeks of tracing with the photo, I discovered a more original way to render mountain ranges other than just tracing from a photo, and also better than relying on imagination alone.

First, you will need the JOSM editor with the PicLayer plug-in installed.

Next, cut a long sheet of tin foil (about 2-3 times longer than the width) and crumple it up. Carefully, unwrap it and flatten it out. Now you can shape it according to your needs: you can flatten some valleys or raise some high peaks, as you like.

Once you're finished, take a photo of your new mountain range and upload it to your computer. Then, open JOSM. Next, open OGF in the location where you want to put your mountains. Click the 'download' button in JOSM. Copy and paste the OGF coordinates in the URL field (for those new to JOSM, make sure opengeofiction is your default site, not openstreetmap)

Next, click 'Imagery', then 'New picture layer from file'. From here, you can select your mountain image. This opens the mountain image as a background layer to OGF. Click on 'Windows', then 'Layers'. Here, you can edit the mountain image layer (you may need to resize, rotate, or adjust the transparency) or go straight to tracing by clicking 'Data Layer 1'.

Scaling the mountains accurately might be tricky. Maybe there are some more experienced mappers here who can advise on the average size of mountains.

Hopefully, this will be helpful for those who would like to render mountains. One caveat is that this is VERY labor intensive, so you might want to stick to rendering a small area you think will be of particular interest, as opposed to a 100-mile-long range.

Location: Dorchester Park Route, Jeremiah, Unesia

Tool of the Trade

Posted by UN1TY on 25 May 2016 in English (English)

I just started working on OGF a couple of months ago and have been working mostly in the initial planning stage of laying out my country Unesia, so I don't really have much mapped out in yet, though I have started bits and pieces, like a city park in Dexter-Overton, a tourist spot in Dorchester National Park, and a small city in Commonia (Somerset).

Over the past 25 years, I've been designing fantasy cityscapes and maps, and as a result, I've amassed a lot of original artwork.

Today, I was working feverishly compiling my artwork and images in preparation for my wiki pages and, in the process of doing so, pushed my computer to it's limits.

In the past seven years my Toshiba Qosmio has seen numerous upgrades, replaced motherboards, and even survived a lightning strike, but resizing a few hundred .jpegs finally caused it to go haywire.

It's still working (as you can see), but somehow it thinks I want to delete every file I open (NOT a good mind reader :)). So far, deleting the 'delete' app from the task manager is working, but I don't know how long I can make that a routine.

Hopefully, I can afford to buy a new computer in a few months, but until then every day this one still works is a blessing.

Location: Dorchester Park Route, Jeremiah, Unesia
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